Published on Wed Jul 21 2021

Probing the association between resting state brain network dynamics and psychological resilience

Kraft, D., Fiebach, C.

This study aimed at replicating a previously reported negative correlation between node flexibility and psychological resilience. We acquired multiband resting-state BOLD fMRI from 60 participants and assessed resilience with three psychological questionnaires. We found no significant correlations between resilience and any of the measures of dynamic functional connectivity.

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Abstract

This study aimed at replicating a previously reported negative correlation between node flexibility and psychological resilience. To this end, we acquired multiband resting-state BOLD fMRI (TR = .675 sec) from 60 participants and assessed resilience with three psychological questionnaires. Time resolved functional connectivity was calculated by performing a sliding window approach on averaged time series from the Schaefer 100 parcellation, resulting in 753 connectivity matrices. Node degree was calculated as a proxy for time-varying connectivity. Multilayer modularity detection was performed to track network reconfigurations over time and to calculate node flexibility (the number of times a node changes community assignment) and node promiscuity (the fraction of communities a node participates in). We found no significant correlations between resilience and any of the measures of dynamic functional connectivity, neither at nodal, functional network, or global levels. Results were also robust against down-sampling the data to resemble a conventional TR of ~2 sec (as in the original study) and against the application of different windowing schemes (overlapping vs. non-overlapping, different window lengths). We discuss several methodological reasons that may account for the difference in results between the present and the original study, to inform future network neuroscience studies of mental health.